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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 25, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. hollywood producer harvey weinstein is expected to surrender to police in new york to face criminal charges in the next hour following allegations of rape and sexual assault by dozens of women. joseph isaacs is found guilty of the attempted murder of 96—year—old d—day veteran jim booth after repeatedly hitting him on the head with a hammer. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon says a new report out today will "restart the debate" about scottish independence china has appealed to both north korea and the us to show patience after president trump cancelled his planned summit with kim jong—un. north korea says it's willing to continue dialogue with the us any time, any place. also, why are we getting all those emails from businesses? it's because of of new laws that come into force today , designed to give us more control over our personal data.
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we'll answer your questions on how it works in half an hour. the name is boyle, danny boyle. the trainspotting director is in charge of the newjames bond film. and hundreds of liverpool fans are still looking for a way to get to kiev for the champions league final tomorrow after flights into the city were cancelled. good morning. it's friday 25th may. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. in the next hour, the american film producer, harvey weinstein, is expected to surrender to new york police to face a charge of sexual misconduct. that's according to us media reports.
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mr weinstein faces arrest and criminal charges and could appear in court later today. over the past eight months, dozens of women have come forward to say that they've been assaulted and propositioned. mr weinstein insists any sex was consensual. our north america correspondent david willis has more. harvey weinstein, once a fixture on the red carpet, it seems his dramatic fall from grace is about to enter a new chapter. the man who racked up oscars for films such as shakespeare in love is today expected to turn himself in to detectives and face charges of sexual assault. among his accusers is lucia evans, formerly an aspiring actress, who claims the movie mogul agrees her at his who claims the movie mogul abused her at his office in new york. she and a string of hollywood a—listes, gwyneth paltrow and angelina jolie among them, were part of a chorus of accusations
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which gave rise to the #metoo movement and led to powerful and predatory men in a numberfields being held to account, the latest being morgan freeman, who has now issued a public apology following accusations of inappropriate behaviour onset. the italian actress asia argento, who last weekend repeated claims harvey weinstein raped her, heralded the news he now planned to turn himself in with a single word on twitter. "boom." as well as new york, harvey weinstein is also the subject of sexual assault in quarries in london and los angeles. he has previously denied any accusations of nonconsensual sex. david willis, bbc news, washington. and laura podesta from cbs joins us from new york. good morning. it is likely at
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stewart from view at the moment by the lorry behind you, but when that truck moves we will be able to see a police precinct there in new york and is that where harvey weinstein is expected to hand himself over to the police? that is exactly right. just beyond this truck behind me is the new york city police priest dinks where we expect harvey weinstein to hand themselves in seven and a half months after the new york times article that first came out with all these sexual misconduct allegations. you can see these sexual misconduct allegations. you can see several these sexual misconduct allegations. you can see several police standing by the dark, we hear that around seven o'clock new york time he will be walking in by himself, he will not be handcuffed. that will happen inside. since those allegations came forward in the article we know that in the months since, dozens of women have recounted similar stories of
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abuse and assault and rape and misconduct. we do not know for which exactly he will be charged today. we hear it was the 2004 case involving lucia caverns. she says that she was forced to perform oral sex with him. that would be a criminal sexual act and the punishment would be up to 25 yea rs and the punishment would be up to 25 years in prison. we'll harvey weinstein be taken from that police precinct to the court today? he will be taken to a courthouse very near here, to fume and it is walk away. he will be taken by police at that point, handcuffed, and then he will be... i want to mention that this case is one of the several that are still under
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investigation. there was another one in new york in 2010 involving another actress who says she was raped twice by having weaned stain —— have a weinstein. there are other allegations in london. he says everything was consensual but there was no wrongdoing, that he is innocent. and in the seven and a half or eight months since the allegations came to a wider public attention, where has he been, why has he not, many people will be wondering, handed himself and the police before now or made himself be handed over? he has been largely out of the public eye. his wife left him, he has been at homes in california and other states. he has not made any public comment. i want to stop right
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now because there seems to be a lot of movement behind me. we will see if we can see anything right now by vidar. we see getting out of this car. c if harvey weinstein is coming now. he will becoming on his own accord. he will not be handcuffed or escorted by police are anything like that. you can see the media activity, cameras, reporters. the police have set up a barricade so the media do not rush into this kind of situation. i am keeping a close eye to see we can show you anything now. any other questions? as we watch this, no surprise to see the huge media interest in his arrival given that the allegations against him are
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really the first wave of allegations made against various individuals and then beat need to campaign and everything that has followed from these allegations against harvey weinstein. absolutely and i think a lot of people want to know if he will say anything when he walks from the car into the police station. ido into the police station. i do not think that was him. we are seeing police backing up against the media and trying to keep everything contained so this is a peaceful walk and no one comes forward tries to assault him and to keep him safe and keep reporters and police safe as well. it is a massive media presence, every media outlet in the new york area is here, international outlets of course. i
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think we want to know if he is going to offer any sort of apology, any statement. the has been very quiet since the allegations happened back in october. in terms of any charges that will be brought, these are charges brought by the state of new york rather than federal charges and my right in saying? that is correct. they are going to be criminal charges which are brought by the state of new york. it would be a criminal sexual act is what we are assuming he will be charged with today, the penalty of 25 years. and do we think it is possible that he is in that black vehicle just opposite or not, laura? it does look like that car is not
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moving. i cannot say, i cannot see through the windows to see if he is inside. police seem to be clearing away from the car to the entrance. if he's in that car, he will be able to go in ina if he's in that car, he will be able to go in in a matter of seconds. it will be tough to get more than a few photos of him at that point. i want to mention that there are a lot of women here and i wonder if any of his potential victims friends of victims are here because it has been a national reckoning since october, the fact has started the #metoo movement. that was ignited by these allegations. it has created the downfall. it will be interesting to see if anyone is here to shout something as he walks in. he has not
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had the chance to see him in the flash since the allegations came up. it will be interesting to see what people say when they see him. do stay with us laura. reminding our view is that we are watching the doors of this police precinct in new york city where harvey weinstein, the movie producer with a string of allegations made against him by women over the last eight months or so women over the last eight months or so is expected to hand himself over to police. laura, could you remind oui’ to police. laura, could you remind our viewers what we are expecting to happen today. we are expecting him to walk through these doors to turn himself over to police. he will then be in police custody and at that point go to a courthouse which is just a nearby for the formal charges, for the
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arrangement. what we're expecting is he will be charged with a criminal sexual act stemming from a case in 2004 involving actress lucia evans who said that harvey weinstein forced her to perform oral sex on him in his manhattan office. while there have been dozens of cases it involving harvey weinstein which have come forward recently, it is this case that we are hearing that is the one that is finally had enough evidence or enough testimony that police feel they have a case here and the district attorney feels there is a conviction. why is he handed himself over in this way rather than being arrested and charged, people may have expected that would be the way it unfolded. that is a really good question. i am
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not in his mind the mind of his attorney but he has always maintained his innocence so i think by turning himself in he is saying, here i am, i will tell you my side of the story. it is not a situation where they have to go to his home and have to apprehend him with any sort of force. i think he's turning himself in to get the process over with. i hope —— i'm sure he hopes he can maintain his innocence. how important is this for the women who have accused him of crimes against them for the #metoo campaign and so on, how big a moment is this? this is a huge movement because at the very minimum this is going to give those winning closure. at the maximum, a conviction in this case is going to help their cases. i do believe this is a momentous occasion
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for the ten three movement —— #metoo movement. laura, we arejust movement. laura, we are just going to come away from you for the moment. i know you will keep an eye out for us at the precinct there. and we will come back to you if there is any sense that harvey weinstein is about to arrive. a man who repeatedly hit a 96—year—old d—day veteran with a claw hammer during a raid on his home has been found guilty of attempted murder. joseph isaacs attacked jim booth in the attack on 22 november. mr booth spent nine days in hospital following the burglary at his home in taunton, somerset. in the past few minutes the detective who led the investigation said, "it was a cowardly act and it's
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a miracle mr booth survived these horrific injuries." you have been praised by prime ministers and danced with a duchess, it seems nothing phases you. for the first time, 96 he rolled a jim booth is describing the moment he was attacked in his somerset home bya he was attacked in his somerset home by a bogus builder wielding a claw hammer. he hit me six times on behalf of as well as more on the arms with the claw hammer with the claw side of it. each time between it, it was shouting, money, money, money! he somehow managed to stagger out of his house into the lane to alert neighbours even though he had a fractured skull, he was concussed and covered in blood. to suffer that level of abuse with a
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hammer, people would expect that to be fatal, but it is his strength of character and resilience that helped him walk through. maybe it was his military training, but he reckons he would not go down without a fight and took on his attacker. i hit attacker. ihit him. attacker. i hit him. i couldn't believe it. i think ijust defended myself. but i was special service and i think i should learn how to deal with this because i should not be too old. two days later, joseph isaacs was arrested. the jury was told he two days later, joseph isaacs was arrested. thejury was told he had been traced after using the war veteran's stolen bank cards. jim hopes he will soon be cycling again and plaguing the church organ like he did before the attack. and as a vetera n he did before the attack. and as a veteran of the normandy landings, he is philosophical about what he has been through. worst things that happened —— have
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happened. the prime minister's europe adviser 0liver robbins has defended the work of britain's brexit team after reports that the eu accused the government of having a "fantasy" approach to withdrawal negotiations. mr robbins tweeted that ‘uk proposals for a deep relationship, were calmly and professionally presented'. the chancellor philip hammond added that everyone involved was aware of the deadlines and working constructively towards them. we are having very constructive discussions. i do not think that is a particularly helpful comment. they're obviously a wide range of views on both sides, but everybody that i've engaged with has been very constructive, very keen to find a way to move forward. we are very conscious of the ticking clock and the need to make significant progress for the june european council, and that is what here to do. 0ur correspondent in brussels damian grammaticus joins me now. hello. can you tell us more about the background to this and why mr
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robbins has had to issue this defence? what we have had is a latest round of discussions going on between the technical teams and the briefings following about coming from the eu side were real frustration from them saying they still felt in many thiem is that progress was very, very slow 01’ is that progress was very, very slow or allusive and they put it down to this idea that the uk had a fantasy that it could keep all of the benefits of eu membership whilst being outside. it said that the uk had turned get beyond that idea before negotiations could move forward , before negotiations could move forward, particularly on the issue of northern ireland, the border, there is real concern of air that there is real concern of air that the uk proposals are not substantial enough, do not address the real issue there, and that therefore there is not enough progress yet before the summit of eu readers chew injune. before the summit of eu readers chew
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in june. this response before the summit of eu readers chew injune. this response from mr hammond has come following the briefing, pushing back mr robins saying that they are approaching it constructively. i think the issue is the content of the proposals. mr hammond then says that this was not a helpful thing for the eu to say. and despite what we heard from those defending the negotiating position, this is going to be fuel to the fire for government critics who say the negotiations and not merely as far along the path as they should be. their register if you weeks now until thatjune summit late in june. eu leaders meet here in brussels and on the agenda that is the need to have sufficient progress on this issue of the border between northern ireland and the republic. and there was not that progress at the moment.
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the ee you says it is waiting for new proposals to be tabled by the uk government, but time is running out very fast because that's summit is looming and at that summit, the irish have made it clear with the backing of other states that they are not satisfied with what they have seen so far. they say what they have seen so far. they say what they have seen so far. they say what they have seen from the uk site does not add up at the minute to a solution, there cannot be a time—limited backstop. they say that the backstop isa backstop. they say that the backstop is a back door way of keeping single single market access for the whole of the uk and that there would be this bespoke situation for northern ireland. this is the critical area where the difficulties and detox focus at the minute. thank you very much for that, damian
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grammaticus in brussels. voters in the republic of ireland are heading to the polls to vote in a landmark referendum on whether the country should end the criminalisation of abortion. many people have travelled home from abroad, in order to vote. the ban on almost all pregnancy terminations was enshrined in the constitution 35 years ago. north korea says it is willing to continue dialogue with the united states at any time and any place. it comes after president trump announced he's cancelling a planned summit with kimjong un in singapore next month. 0ur asia correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes reports. if pyongyang suspected its longed—for summit with the us president was about to be cancelled, there was no sign of it here. at a top—secret site, deep in the mountains, a group of foreign journalists were shown the tunnels where north korea tested its nuclear weapons. and then the show began.
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tunnels at the site. they were laced with explosives, they walked us right up to the doors of these tunnels to show us. then they blew it up and then brought us back and said, double check, see we have done this, we want to be transparent. the only problem is, the only people there were journalists, not experts on what it takes to shut down a nuclear test site. what we saw with our eyes is that they did blow up the entrances to the tunnels, we do not know what else occurred or if that site is unusable.
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this was supposed to be pyongyang's big gesture ahead of the kim—trump summit. but thousands of miles away in washington, president trump had suddenly changed his mind. based on the recent statement of north korea, i have decided to terminate the planned summit in singapore onjune 12. i believe that this is a tremendous setback for north korea and indeed a setback for the world. when it came, north korea's response was surprisingly soft. the unilateral announcement to cancel the summit is unexpected and we cannot but feel great regret from it, the vice foreign minister said. we have the intent to sit with the us side to solve problems regardless, at any time. here in seoul, there has also been shock and consternation. this photo shows a grim faced president moonjae—in holding an emergency cabinet meeting in the middle of the night. he said he was perplexed and regretful.
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apparently no—one from washington had bothered to call him before his close ally president trump made his dramatic announcement. danny boyle, the director know for trainspotting and the london 2012 olympics, will direct the next james bond film. bond 25, as it is currently called, will begin shooting in december and will be daniel craig's fifth outing as 007. the film is set to be released in october next year. with me now is our entertainment correspondent david sillito. good morning to you. so david boyle —— danny boyle and bond. it is not a surprise because danny boyle spoke about the fact that he and his screenwriter had been working on an idea a month or two ago, so this is official confirmation that the fans have long
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been expecting. if you think about it, trainspotting, shallow grave, slumdog millionaire, 28 days later and the opening ceremony of the 0lympics back in 2012, he has proved he can do it action films and he has said in the past that he was try to think what links his very different films and he said it is character is facing overwhelming odds and if that isn't james bond... it facing overwhelming odds and if that isn'tjames bond... it is must like he was born to do it which sets up massive expectations. but remember the fears of the 2012 opening ceremony after we saw what happened in beijing, thinking how will britain's computer? and danny boyle had a lot of help from james bond, daniel craig for that as well. and that was the moment where people's jaws hit the ground, they thought, what is this? in moment of spectacle we were not expecting with
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the parachute jump at the beginning. lots of questions to be answered about what will be in the film. well, bond 25, something will special will be expected. we have run out of ian fleming titles. i was looking through the ones that have not been years. we have the tell to mark —— thereafter new bond novels that have been written in recent years and one of my favourites is by anthony horowitz. i think it will be down to danny horowitz. i think it will be down to da n ny boyle horowitz. i think it will be down to danny boyle committee will have the control. thank you very much. now time for the weather. lots of sunshine in the forecast over the next few days, temperatures on the
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rise as well but there is a big caveat with that, there is also big storms. lots of sunshine at the moment in the highlands, equally so in northern ireland full of will continue in the afternoon. some cloud in the far north of scotland. more cloud for england and wales, risk of heavy rain across northern england, midlands into wales. risk of eggs under showers in east anglia later, but the south—east, there will be brighter skies. temperatures generally open to the 20s but a bit cooler, where there is the cloud and rain. tonight, some showers knocking around, particularly further south into the early hours of saturday morning. a muggy night for many in the south, temperatures staying up at 14 degrees. as we go into the weekend we will see plenty of dry and bright weather in the northern half of the uk. still sunshine in the south but always the risk of heavy and thundery showers to watch out for and temperatures will be on
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the rise. i buy. bye—bye. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: harvey weinstein is expected to surrender to police in the next few moments in new york to face criminal charges for the first time after numerous accusations of rape and sexual assault. and we're keeping an eye on the police precinct in new york where harvey weinstein is due to appear to hand himself in. a man who attacked a d—day veteran, repeatedly hitting him on the head with a hammer, has been found guilty of attempted murder. joseph isaacs attacked 96—year—old jim booth after going to his house hoping to steal money. the scottish national party has released a report outlining their plans for an independent scotland, aiming to restart the debate. the prime minister's europe adviser 0liver robbins has defended the work of britain's brexit team after reports that the eu accused the government of having a fantasy approach to withdrawal negotiations. north korea has said it's
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still willing to talk at any time in any form after us president donald trump abruptly cancelled his meeting with kim jong—un. the leaders had been due to meet in singapore to discuss denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. and now it is time for the sport. england are hoping for early wickets on the first day of the match against pakistan. steady progress for pakistan so far. england are hoping to make inroads after a poor batting performance yesterday but as you can see so far no
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batting performance yesterday but as you can see so far no luck, with two knock out batsman doing well. rory mcilroy has continued his good run at the pga championship at wentworth. he shot a 5 under par 67 on thursday, and has now moved onto nine under par with 4 birdies and no dropped shots. he is 11 under par on 14 holes in his second round. swedish ryder cup hopeful alex noren is also in contention. plenty of players still to go out in their second rounds. the liverpool team are in kiev having arrived ahead of the champions league final tomorrow night. hoping that their fans will have similar success in getting there. problems with cancelled flights could leave around 1,000 supporters stranded. others are already half way there. some fans left in the early hours
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of yesterday morning. 0thers others have already made it. we came from israel in the early hours of yesterday. what was it like booking accommodation? it was pretty difficult. we booked it two weeks ago on a birthday. one day after the semifinal. it was 2000 euros for each of us for the tryst, for the hotels and the flight and the tickets for the game so it is pretty expensive. world champion boxing trainer brendan ingle has died at the age of 77. the dublin—born former fighter became a highly regarded trainer at his sheffield—based wincobank gym. and guided british boxers johnny nelson and naseem hamed to world titles. he fought as a professional middleweight boxer in his mid—20s and after retiring became a trainer. made an mbe in 1998 for his services
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and contributions to british boxing and work with young people in the sheffield area. he went into boxing after a dance he went to at his local church descended into violence and he got held his boxing gloves to referee this guy feels. —— scuffles. european boxing champion natasha gale has been ruled out of defending her title next month for disciplinary reasons. she hasn't fought since exiting the commonwealth games at the quarterfinals. gb boxing said she was suspended following a disciplinary process into her conduct as a member of the gb boxing squad. eddiejones has called up four uncapped players to start against the barbarians at twickenham on sunday with henry trinder at outside centre, and jack singleton, elliott stooke and zach mercer in the forwards. elliot daly will move to full back for the exhibition match, having been employed predominantly as a winger by eddiejones. danny cipriani will start on the bench, his first involvement under eddie jones. the italian alps will provide another stern test of simon yates credentials, as he bids to defend his lead in the giro d'italia.
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he struggled on stage 18 yesterday, losing half of his lead to defending champion tom dumoulin. it's down to just 28 seconds with two big mountain stages in the next two days. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. allow me to come to the next section inafew allow me to come to the next section in a few moments because first i wa nt to in a few moments because first i want to show you a conversation answering your questions and then these live pictures from new york. this aerial shot is showing you the first precinct there. to the left and to the right of that door there are lines of photographers and camera crews and reporters because they are waiting on harvey wayne stein, that movie mogul accused of
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dozens stein, that movie mogul accused of d oze ns of stein, that movie mogul accused of dozens of women of rape and other sexual assaults and he is expected to hand himself over to police there in the next short while. they are expecting him to arrive at the station, at the precinct, and then from there he will be taken, we understand, to a few minutes away to face charges. as soon as we see him arriving we are going to show you the images. it might be in the middle of our next conversation but we will bring those images to you. a new law designed to give people more control over their data has taken effect. the general data protection regulation, or gdpr, affects how companies and organisations collect, store and share information, but what does it mean for you, how you run your business, how companies can use your personal data? with me now to answer some of your questions, chris foxx, bbc‘s technology correspondent,
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and annabel kaye, an employment law and hr specialist and co—founder of koffeeklatch, a firm that consults on gdrp. good to see you. let us begin at the very beginning. what exactly is gdpr? it is a new law in the eu which is meant to standardise data protection laws so everyone is on the same page. it has a further scope because even companies outside the eu in china and the us will have to follow the new rules if they are offering their services within the eu and it gives us new rights such as a ccess eu and it gives us new rights such as access and erasure so you can go toa as access and erasure so you can go to a big company and say you want a copy of all of your information and they have to give it to you and if you are not happy for them to have it so as as consumers it is good news. annabel, these companies want
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to maintaina news. annabel, these companies want to maintain a relationship with us evenif to maintain a relationship with us even if we ordered something from them ten years ago. even if we never did, looking at my inbox. i have e—mails from people we never have done business with. it is for two reasons. one is that the rules on consent are changing and people used to steal your information and put you on a mailing list and e—mail you stuff and if a value after today they need positive consent from you to do that. the other one is a big misunderstanding, that the idea has been extended to everyone who contacts you about anything. if you are an existing customer you already can be e—mail but people have got in a muddle and the whole world has decided to spam my inbox this morning with the please tick the box. there is a question here from twitter asking, why haven't the gdpr e—mails stopped? he is still getting them today. companies are exercising an abundance of caution. if they
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have not previously sought consent to put you on a mailing list it kind of makes sense and it is good manners to ask and make sure you are above the law. there are other reasons why companies can contact you and it would not be unreasonable for if you are part of a swimming clu b for if you are part of a swimming club for them to send you e—mails without you specifically consented because you would expect to get e—mails from them. because you would expect to get e-mails from them. this comes to the next question, how come some companies are still sending an opt in e—mail but others are saying they have updated their privacy policy andi have updated their privacy policy and i don't need to respond. have updated their privacy policy and i don't need to respondm might be that you have different relationships with them. you'll relationships with them. you'll relationship that a customer or a member doesn't necessarily mean need consent but your relationship as someone they might sell something to one—day dials. they are all sorts of different relationships going on and thatis different relationships going on and that is why you are getting different e—mails. that is why you are getting different e-mails. this one is quite specific. this person asks that if
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the charity outsources it services is the it company third—party processor of all the data in the service? perhaps you can answer that to explain to the viewers what the implications and the context of that question is. gdpr is full of jargon and one of the ideas is first and second and third parties and the first party would be the data subject so if you are collecting information about me, that is made. the second party is the organisation and in this case that is the charity ended the charities using software or virtual assistant or external resources to process that data about a third party and therefore a data processor. ok. it is perfectly safe, andi processor. ok. it is perfectly safe, and i use the word safe' is, to ignore these e—mails. and i use the word safe' is, to ignore these e-mails. yes, if you ignore these e-mails. yes, if you ignore them in theory they will take you off the mailing list and you will get no more e—mails from them but it is not all about consent,
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there are other reasons why companies can keep you on their mailing list so you may still get marketing messages but i would be surprised if you do. for all of us we are looking at these e—mails coming in and we are paying attention to some that we might do business with again and the ones we really haven't had much to do with over the years we are casually deleting, i guess everyone is in the same boat. i don't think the law has really changed in that sense data protection laws always said that people should remove data if you we re people should remove data if you were not really using it so this is good to clarify and make companies look at who is on their books. and it makes us all think about our data and where it is and who has got it and where it is and who has got it and who is using it. and who we are sharing with it. i logged into a coffee bar near here and use their free wi—fi and the first thing you ask me for was my date of birth of
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that in order to give me access to wi-fi. that in order to give me access to wi—fi. businesses are very greedy about data. if we look at this from the business and employers perspective, and i will get you both to a nswer perspective, and i will get you both to answer this, how does it affect them, has it been hugely unwieldy for some businesses, particularly smaller ones? it depends where they get were in the first place. if they we re get were in the first place. if they were already comply with the data protection laws we had yesterday, it isa protection laws we had yesterday, it is a 10% or 20% shift but there are hundreds of thousands of small businesses who have never heard of the law we had until yesterday and then they suddenly woke up to the fa ct then they suddenly woke up to the fact they had to comply with the new laws and that is very tricky if you do not think that way and you have never heard of it and all of a sudden you don't know what you are doing. well, for small businesses it is perhaps a bit harder to comply but they are common—sense things. if you are a salon, for example, and
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have customer records, even if you keep them on paper and on a file you should lock them away and stop people having access to them who should not have access to them. it is just should not have access to them. it isjust common should not have access to them. it is just common sense to keep people's data secure and not collect any more data than you need to. we have heard there is a grace period and companies could get large fines if they do not comply. some companies have already sought for an extension to the deadline. the web domain registry can look online and you can see who owns web addresses and they sought for an extension because they said they were not going to be compliant in time and the eu said no and said they had had two years to get compliant. in the last few minutes we have heard that four complaints have been made against google, what's up, facebook and instagram already from privacy advocates who say they are in breach of the law because they are bundling consent and saying that either you sign up and agree to have targeted
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advertising and hand over all of your data or you do not use the service and that bundling is not allowed under gdpr, you have to be able to cut separate out the consent for the service and for the advertising. that is very interesting. for all of us on the receiving end of the e—mails, if we are receiving end of the e—mails, if we a re really receiving end of the e—mails, if we are really missing the e—mail from a particular company missing up in our inbox we can opt in again. watch out though there are scammers and fissures sending e—mails at the moment and hoping you will click another button. very good advice. thank you for answering your questions. we will now take another look at the scene in new york where we are waiting for the arrival of harvey weinstein, the movie producer accused of rape and sexual assault by d oze ns accused of rape and sexual assault by dozens of women in a story that began to unfold to the wider public
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view about 7.5 months ago and it led to the me too movement. we understand he will be handing himself in very soon and that will be taken a short distance to a nearby court. we will be back there when we see him arrive. a leading cancer scientist says the serious failures in england's breast cancer screening programme go back further, and affected more women than previously thought. hundreds of thousands of women were not invited for a scan when they were aged between 68 and 71. here's our health and science correspondent james gallagher. screening helps spot breast cancer early. women aged 50—70 should be offered a mammogram every three years but it was revealed computer problems meant some invites were never sent and the failure may have shortened to lives. tragically there are likely to be some people in this group who would have been alive today
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if the failure had not happened. officials said the problem started in 2009 but new research shows it goes back to 2005, some four years earlier. the government had estimated 450,000 women were not invited for the final scan but now scientists say tens of thousands more women may have been affected. it's taken 13 years to spot that we did not implement the policy the way we said we were going to do it. things need to change to make sure that we work out what we are doing and it is somebody‘s job to actually inspect, to collect the data, inspect the data and make sure we are doing things right. public health england rejected the findings seeing the analysis was flawed and that an independent review will look at all aspects of the breast screening service. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon says a new report out today
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will restart the debate about scottish independence. the sustainable growth commission will set out proposals for a so—called come to scotland package as part of efforts to boost the country's population but other parties said the pursuit of independence is doing nothing for scotland's economy. they say they should keep a pound to maintain independence. the report includes detailed plans to help the funds and good order towards the rest of the united kingdom. in a bid to drive innovation and population growth the report says highly skilled migrant worker should receive tax relief. with me now is
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the author of the report. thank you for your time today. when nicola sturgeon says this report will restart the debate in independence, do you think it does? it gives a sense of ambition about what the country can become in economic and social terms. no matter where you stand on the political spectrum, in the uk as well as in scotland, there isa the uk as well as in scotland, there is a sense that this is not as good as it gets in the uk economy prospects are not good and brexit is very disorderly and the state of our society and economy is very unequal and the performance of the regions of the uk's very unequal and as michael heseltine pointed out a number of years ago nothing is being done about it so we have lots of opportunity and we have looked to the 12 best performing small advanced economies in the world and asked them what they have that we don't and the answer is not a lot but have purposeful effort over a generation of all sides of the
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spectrum in a political sense that what we are speaking. does that move the debate on from before the independence referendum where no other issue divided voters so much as the question over whether an independent scotland could do better economically than if it remained pa rt economically than if it remained part of the union, does the report really move that on? i think the most obvious thing to say about that is that the world has moved on even without the report. brexit has changed the world and the prospects for the european and uk economies have changed fundamentally we are on a course that people in scotland did not choose and many other people in the uk would not choose sophie will did not change but we want to check make a framework that allows people to prepare and such that a the we start of these policies now and the great news for example on migration is in this little part of the world all of the political parties agree that migrants are a good thing and a necessity and should be encouraged unwelcome but it is not true everywhere. there are things we can
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start on now but we also have a framework that is so should the parliament in scotland choose to put the question to the people again, we will be very well prepared for it and we will have certainty under plan of attack that allows us to get things onto an even keel and towards the best performing countries in the world, but not overnight, over a generation. what does the report say about the issue of currency? the then chancellor during the independent reference —— referendum said the uk government would not be willing to form a monetary union with an independent scotland and allow it to continue to use the pound. that is right. the formal currency union is not sustainable because it takes two to tango when it comes to these arrangements but we have listened to the advice of the former governor of the bank of england, mervyn king, who said what we have suggested would be the sensible thing to do and in a different world and a different century and a different time i did
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just this. it recognises the integration between scotland and the uk in every sense and give straight a nswe rs uk in every sense and give straight a nswers to uk in every sense and give straight answers to the questions about what it means for mortgages, pensions, savings and investments so it locks instability and it means we accept the monetary policy of the bank of england which is find relief of the short and medium—term because we are performing closest to the uk average of any performing closest to the uk average ofany uk performing closest to the uk average of any uk region so ironically, i suppose, monetary policy is more suited to scotland than any other uk region but over time we have created six tests against which we judge whether it will make sense when we are so successfully diversifying our trade and hopefully in growing the economy, that it would make sense to put it to the test to have our own currency. we think taken together it allows us to focus the government in the early years of any transition where it really ought to be focused which is on growing the economy are pulling society together and putting right the inherited public finances which unsustainably managed by the uk at present. thank you very much. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live:
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hollywood producer harvey weinstein is expected to surrender to police in new york to face criminal charges shortly following allegations of rape and sexual assault by dozens of women. joseph isaacs is found guilty of the attempted murder of 96—year—old d—day veteran jim booth after repeatedly hitting him on the head with a hammer. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon says a new report out today will restart the debate about scottish independence. hello. this is the business news. the diy chain homebase has been sold for £1. its australian owner wesfarmers paid £340 million for the retailer two years ago, but after a disastrous tenure, losses and other costs will bring its total bill to about £1 billion. the buyers are restructuring specialist hilco, which rescued music chain hmv in 2013. its thought future restructuring
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could result in store closures and more job losses. more on that in just a moment. uk gdp growth remained at 0.1% in the first quarter of the year thanks, in part, to the cold snap, the so—called beast from the east. that's according to the office for national statistics in its second estimate of economic activity. between january and march, a major drag was growth in the construction sector falling by 2.7%, compared with an initial estimate of 3.3%. as you've been hearing, new european data protection laws come into force today — the general data protection regulation. and its effects are already being felt with a number of high—profile us news websites becoming temporarily unavailable in europe. the chicago times and la times were among those posting messages saying they were currently unavailable in most countries. could this go down as one of the most disastrous retail acquisitions ever? the bungled buy of homebase by australia's westfarmers back in 2016 has resulted in an almost
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£1 billion in losses. a failure to understand the uk market is largely blamed, while deteriorating economic conditions certainly didn't help. the promised restructuring under new owners hilco will inevitably result in store closures and more job losses on the high street. homebase currently has about 250 stores and 11,500 workers. joining us now is russ mould, investment director at aj bell. so, what did westfarmers do so wrong here? they admitted that by and large they bungled the acquisition and they got several things wrong. first of all they assumed the format that had been so successful in their domestic market would work well over there, effectively big metal sheds. they didn't get their stock right and they lacked availability of certain products at key times of the year and they took out all the soft furnishings which alienates to be pa rt furnishings which alienates to be
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part of their customer base, particularly female buyers. it is partly product and style and also what works in one country doesn't work in another. they immediately sacked the senior management after buying it and they now say that was a mistake. you mentioned that stores that were converted to a burning is brand, they will now be converted back to homebase? yes, change of brand and getting rid of all of the management team, you need those people there to start with so you know where the problems are and the pressure points and what the company actually does well so to get rid of all of that experience in one fell swoop was something that the current westfa rmers swoop was something that the current westfarmers chief executive officer regrets and it is very difficult for him because he didn't sanction the deal, his predecessor did at and then he left to become the australian football league commissioner and left mr scott to pick up the pieces. £1 billion worth
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of losses and just two years. moving forward , of losses and just two years. moving forward, the new buyers are restructuring specialist and they turned around hmv. but restructuring will inevitably mean some job losses and store closures, won't it? it will be worrying time for all of the employees of westfarmers and we have to be very aware of that. the company has kept hmv going and they also own a staples business here in the uk which they have kept around at reduced format and the hmv store and —— estate is much smaller so we expect there will be homebase still around but whether it is still 250 isa around but whether it is still 250 is a very open question and we do fear closures and cos cuts along the line. we have to leave it there. more analysis on this on our website including analysis from our business correspondent that the energy to check it out. let us have a look at the markets. the ftse 100 has got off to a good start on its last trading session before the long bank holiday weekend, but is still set to post a slight weekly loss,
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breaking an eight—week run of gains. confirmation that britain's economy barely grew during the first quarter of 2018 had little impact. kingfisher europe's second largest home improvement retailer, posted the best performance after australia's wesfarmers announced it would sell uk rival homebase. and bt‘s shares are up on reports that infrastructure investors and private equity groups have expressed interest in taking a minority or majority stake in its 0penreach division, which owns the uk's national telecom and broadband network. bt has declined to comment. that's all the business news. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with for a look at the weather. hello. we have got a lot of cloud at the moment across england and wales
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and outbreaks of rain as well. it is not as nice as it has been in the last few days. this is the scene at the moment from a weather watcher in east yorkshire. it is cloudy here with rain. further north we have sunshine. we continue with sunshine across much of scotland and northern ireland and there is a bitter cloud affecting the far north of scotland but in england and wales it remains cloudy with outbreaks of rain moving northward and westwood and later in the day it is heavy and potential showers. in the south—east it will be brighter and sunnier and the maximum temperature in the sunshine could reach the 20s but it is a bit cooler. for the start of the biggest weekend of perth and belfast this afternoon and into the evening it will be pretty decent and dry with some sunshine. for the rest of the evening still a bit of rain to come across england and where of and some
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heavy showers moving away into the far south of england and into saturday morning and the temperatures are down to nine or 14 degrees so it could be quite warm and mucky across southern areas to start the weekend but into the weekend is warmer. temperatures by sunday are up to 28 even across scotla nd sunday are up to 28 even across scotland and the temperatures could reach the mid—20s. let us have a look at saturday. cloudy across southern areas under heavy showers starting to move their way in here with thunderstorms but generally speaking the further north you are the drier and brighter with sunshine. temperatures into the 20s and on saturday these are the kinds of temperatures we expect. plenty of dry weather and perhaps a bit cooler and cloudy in swansea with a chance ofa and cloudy in swansea with a chance of a shower here. by sunday still a risk of some of these heavy and thundery showers moving in a cross areas but further north on sunday and bank holiday monday it looks largely dry and bright with some sunshine. temperatures into the
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mid—20s and further south it will be cloudy with showers. goodbye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. hollywood producer harvey weinstein is expected to surrender to police
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in new york to face criminal charges very shortly, following allegations of rape and sexual assault by dozens of women. this is the scene outside live the police station in new york where the world's press are waiting for weinstein to arrive. joseph isaacs is found guilty of the attempted murder of 96—year—old d—day veteran jim booth after repeatedly hitting him on the head with a hammer. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon says a new report out today will "restart the debate" about scottish independence. china has appealed to both north korea and the us to show patience after president trump cancelled his planned summit with kim jong—un. north korea says it's willing to continue dialogue with the us any time, any place. also why are we getting all those emails from businesses? it's because of of new laws that come into force today, designed to give us more control over our personal data. the name is boyle, danny boyle.
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the trainspotting director is in charge of the newjames bond film. hundreds of liverpool fans are still looking for a way to get to kiev for the champions league final tomorrow , after flights into the city were cancelled good afternoon. it is friday 25th made. i am annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the american film producer, harvey weinstein, is expected very shortly to surrender to new york police to face a charge of sexual misconduct. that is according to us media reports. we will go live to new york now. we
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will surely this aerial shot of the police precinct in manhattan. you can see to the left and right of the door photographers, film crews, reporters lined up to capture the moment when harvey weinstein arrives. that is expected imminently. it is understood that once he is charged there, you will be taken to a courtjust a few minutes away in manhattan. and we also understand that from reports he will be granted bail. that is expected to be set at $1 million. so, harvey weinstein facing arrest and criminal charges, expected to appear in court later today. of course, over the past eight months, dozens course, over the past eight months, d oze ns of course, over the past eight months, dozens of women have come forward to say they have been assaulted and propositioned by harvey weinstein. he insists the sex was consensual.
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we have more. harvey weinstein, once a fixture on the red carpet, it seems his dramatic fall from grace is about to enter a new chapter. the man who racked up oscars for films such as shakespeare in love is today expected to turn himself in to detectives and face charges of sexual assault. among his accusers is lucia evans, formerly an aspiring actress, who claims the movie mogul abused her at his office in new york. she and a string of hollywood a—listers, gwyneth paltrow and angelina jolie among them, were part of a chorus of accusations which gave rise to the #metoo movement and led to powerful and predatory men in a numberfields being held to account, the latest being morgan freeman, who has now issued a public apology following accusations of inappropriate behaviour onset. the italian actress asia argento, who last weekend repeated claims harvey weinstein raped her,
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heralded the news he now planned to turn himself in with a single word on twitter. "boom." as well as new york, harvey weinstein is also the subject of sexual assault in quarries in london and los angeles. he has previously denied any accusations of nonconsensual sex. david willis, bbc news, washington. letters macro look at the live shot from manhattan again because we are expecting harvey weinstein. we believe he will be handing himself into police very shortly before being taken to a court a short distance away. of course he has a lwa ys distance away. of course he has always maintained that any sex was
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consensual, so it is probable he will be pleading not guilty to any charges put before him. but we understand, as we mentioned, he is likely to be granted bail on the surety of $1 million. and according to the new york times it is reported he will agree to wear a monitoring device, his travel b will be restricted and he will surrender his passport. you saw in the report that that it passport. you saw in the report that thatitis passport. you saw in the report that that it is expected the charges brought against him today will relate to an allegation brought by the actress lucia evans. but it is not clear if he will face further charges brought by others accusers. it is known that police in new york have been investigating allegations of rape made by another actress and a netflix producer has recently
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filed court papers in new york alleging harvey weinstein raped her. the charges today are charges brought here in new york, they are not federal charges, but obviously hugely significant given the #metoo movement and the time is up campaign in the wake of the allegations against harvey weinstein becoming public around eight months ago. so a slightly closer shot of what is happening there on that pavement outside the new york police precinct. the media waiting for harvey weinstein to arrive. we will come back there as soon as we have a new and dictation that he is in fact approaching. a man who attacked a 96—year—old
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world war two d—day veteran with a claw hammer during a raid on his home has been found guilty of attempted murder. joseph isaacs attacked jim booth in the incident on 22 november. mr booth spent nine days in hospital following the burglary at his home in taunton, somerset. jon kay has more details. when you have been recognised for outstanding bravery at d—day, when you have been praised by prime ministers and have even danced with a duchess, it seems nothing phases you. and then he started lifting the thing and pushed me... for the first time, 96—year—old jim booth is describing the moment he was attacked in his somerset home by a bogus builder wielding a claw hammer. he hit me six times on the head as well as more on the arms with the claw hammer — on the claw side of it too. each time between it, shouting, "money, money, money!" somehoinm booth managed to stagger out of his house into the lane
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to alert neighbours even though he had a fractured skull, he was concussed and covered in blood. to suffer that level of abuse with a hammer, most people would expect that to be fatal, but, as i said, it was jim's strength of character and resilience that helped him pull through. maybe it was his military training, butjim reckons he did not go down without a fight and took on his attacker. ipunch... i'd hit him... that's right. and i couldn't believe it. i think ijust defended myself cos he was hitting myself. but i'm saying, i blame myself, because i was special service and i think i should really have known how to deal with this, but i didn't. too old obviously! two days later, joseph isaacs was arrested. thejury was told he had been traced after using the war veteran's stolen bank cards. jim hopes he will soon be cycling
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again and playing the church organ like he did before the attack. and as a veteran of the normandy landings, he is philosophical about what he has been through. worse things happened at sea, as they say, in the war, yeah. voters in the republic of ireland are heading to the polls to vote in a landmark referendum on whether the country should end the criminalisation of abortion. many people have travelled home from abroad, in order to vote. the ban on almost all pregnancy terminations was enshrined in the constitution 35 years ago. the prime minister's europe adviser 0liver robbins has defended the work of britain's brexit team after reports that the eu accused the government of having a "fantasy" approach to withdrawal negotiations. mr robbins tweeted that "uk proposals for a deep relationship, were calmly and professionally presented". the chancellor philip hammond added that everyone involved was aware of the deadlines and working
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constructively towards them. we are having very constructive discussions. i do not think that is a particularly helpful comment. they're obviously a wide range of views on both sides, but everybody that i've engaged with has been very constructive, very keen to find a way to move forward. we are very conscious of the ticking clock and the need to make significant progress for the june european council, and that is what here to do. 0ur brussels correspondent, damian grammaticas, explained the significance of this development there are just a few weeks now until thatjune summit. late in june eu leaders meet here in brussels and on the agenda there is the need to have sufficient progress on this issue of the border between northern ireland and the republic. and there simply is not that progress, that's manifest at the moment. the eu says it is waiting for new proposals to be tabled, a new paper to be tabled by the uk government, but time
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is running out very fast because that summit is looming and at that summit, the irish particularly the irish particularly have made it clear with the backing of other eu states that they are not satisfied with what they have seen so far — and this is the so—called backstop proposal, the eu saying what it's seeing from the uk side does not add up at the minute to a solution, there cannot be a time—limited backstop. the uk's newest idea that the backstop could apply to the whole of the uk simply is not acceptable to the eu because they say that is a back door way of keeping single market access for the whole of the uk and they are this just as a special bespoke solution for northern ireland because of the special situation there. this is the critical area where the difficulties and the talks focus at the minute. letters macro return to the story that we are following closely, the
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story today on newsroom lied because -- bbc story today on newsroom lied because —— bbc newsroom live. story today on newsroom lied because -- bbc newsroom live. members of the media waiting to see the arrival of harvey weinstein who is expected to hand itself and —— hands and self over to police after around eight months of sexual abuse surfaced against him became —— came to a wider public attention. dozens of women accusing him of rape and other sexual assaults and he is expected to hand himself over and then appear in court later in the day. 0ur north american correspondent nada tawfik is in new york for us. no surprise that the level of interest of his arrival.
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absolutely not. the world's media is on the door here at the first preached stink —— precinct. there are no back doors, there is no underground entrance, this is the way he will walk you. the new york times is reporting that he will pay a$1 times is reporting that he will pay a $1 million bail and he will be given an ankle bracelet and he will have to surrender his passport. this is the first criminal case against harvey weinstein since scores of allegations by dozens of women that he sexually assaulted them, some of those allegations including rape. the nypd say they are expecting him here very shortly but they have referred all of their questions to the manhattan district attorney who is handling the criminal case in this matter. soi this matter. so i heard one commentator earlier saying he would be doing the
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so—called perpetrator walk in the full view of the cameras. do we know why it is happening in this way he has not been arrested earlier than this? there has been a lengthy investigation by the manhattan district attorney's office and the nypd and they came under intense pressure because 2015 the da had refused to prosecute harvey weinstein an allegations he groped in model. despite the fact that the nypd had led a sting operation and they had harvey weinstein on tape admitting to touching her and apologising. 0f admitting to touching her and apologising. of course, since harvey weinstein's town hall in october —— downfall in october and the stories
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of abuse were released, the cry from women in hollywood, from the time is up women in hollywood, from the time is up movement, the new york... the prosecutors have been speaking to dozens prosecutors have been speaking to d oze ns of prosecutors have been speaking to dozens of women across the united states and they feel they have enough to charge harvey weinstein. soa enough to charge harvey weinstein. so a hugely significant moment in terms of the harvey weinstein campaign. —— the #metoo campaign. we saw it is all about power. with harvey weinstein he wielded an enormous amount of power, he was a dominant fixture in hollywood, one of the most powerful producers and we have heard from several of his alleged victims that they said he made them feel that they could not speak out, but he used —— he used
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his power to force their silence. many of the leading ladies in hollywood have been speaking out, celebrating the news. 0ne actress said that the thought that. was and now they ~ are and now they ~ are 5—5? brand fio‘fi‘to ff w!“ ~ are fiafid now ‘ to justice. = they are one step closer to justice. we will be back with you as soon as we see any indications that harvey weinstein is about to arrive. thank you very much. and breaking news just coming in from durham police to tell us that a man has been taken to hospital after being shot by an armed police officer around 10:45am. they were called to bishop auckland after a man was reported to have been seen in the area with a handgun. police say during the operation, a suspect was shot and has been taken to hospital. the independent 0ffice has been taken to hospital. the independent office for police conduct has been informed. that is just coming in from durham constabulary. the headlines on bbc
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newsroom live... hollywood producer harvey weinstein is expected to surrender to police in new york to face criminal charges shortly following allegations of rape and sexual assault by dozens of women. joseph isaacs is found guilty of the attempted murder of 96 year old d—day veteranjim booth after repeatedly hitting him on the head with a hammer. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon says a new report out today will "restart the debate" about scottish independence good afternoon. a big weekend of spot ahead. the champions league final on saturday. over an hour gone on the second morning of the first test at lords, and england's bowlers have finally made a breakthrouugh after pakistan resumed this morning on 50—1. it came from mark wood, who who took the wicket
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of haris sohailfor 39, jonny bairstow taking the catch. the touring side have moved onto 101 for 2 a short while ago. former captain top scoring with 70. rory mcilroy has continued his good run at the pga championship at wentworth. he shot a 5 under 67 on thursday, and has now moved onto 12 under par with 7 birdies and no dropped shots after 16 holes of his second round. swedish ryder cup hopeful alex noren is also in contention. rory mcilroy going well on 12 under par. world champion boxing trainer brendan ingle has died at the age of 77. the dublin—born former fighter became a highly regarded trainer at his sheffield—based wincobank gym. and guided british boxers johnny nelson and naseem hamed to world titles. he also trained herol bomber graham during his career
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as a trainer after he had fought himself in the middleweight division. and was made an mbe in 1998. ingle started his gym after the dance he organised for his local church often descended into violence on the streets outside. he decided to get out the boxing gloves and referee the scuffles. european boxing champion natasha gale has been ruled out of defending her title next month for disciplinary reasons. she hasn't fought since exiting the commonwealth games at the quarterfinals. gb boxing said she was suspended following a disciplinary process into her conduct as a member of the gb boxing squad. eddiejones has called up four uncapped players to start against the barbarians at twickenham on sunday with henry trinder at outside centre, and jack singleton, elliott stooke and zach mercer in the forwards. elliot daly will move to full back for the exhibition match, having been employed predominantly as a winger by eddiejones. danny cipriani will start on the bench, his first involvement
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under eddie jones. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. strict new laws on the way companies handle personal information come into force throughout the eu today. the aim of the general data protection regulation, or gdpr, is to give people more control over the data held about them, and ensure businesses are handling it correctly. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones is here to explain more. annita, europe's new data protection regulation is already in uk law and the promise is that it should let you take back control of your personal information. here it is the gdpr — the general data protection regulation. it gives people the right to access the data held on them by organisations. they can correct if the information is wrong
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and even demand that it is all deleted. the regulator in charge of making this work says it is a big change. so there will be some hurdles and pumps at the beginning but i think what is really important here is the law is changing to give people more control over their personal information and they can make choices that stop so there is a lot of focus on this, the last few days especially. we have had 60,000 phone calls in our office and communications from businesses in the last month alone so there is a lot of focus on it and i think that isa lot of focus on it and i think that is a good thing. and those calls have been coming in because firms big and small are worried about what it means for them. companies may need to make sure they have your consent to use your data. they will definitely have to report any data breaches within 72 hours and they could face much biggerfines than before. one small business selling soap said getting to grips with it all had
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been a challenge. we hold a tiny amount of data, but what we have had to do to make sure it is safe, by lockable cabinets, change our software changed descriptions, change contracts, we have had to create new policies. it probably cost us 2005 at japan. we spent a lot on the website and e—mail marketing and we had to do a lot of research into the software in how to make it compliant. there has been lots of stuff that is good practice and i think it has given small businesses a kick up the bum to do it otherwise they would not have done it. now many firms have been worried about the cost of getting it wrong. but the information commissioner has stressed she's not expecting perfection from small businesses from day one. annita. more relatives of people who died in the grenfell tower fire have been remembering their loved ones
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on this, the fifth day, of the public inquiry into the disaster. 72 people were killed by the fire which took hold in the early hours of 14th june last year. the testimonies have been harrowing in detail. 0ur correspondent tom burridge is at the hearing in west london. absolutely more very difficult listening. very much so. the courage that the relatives have shown this morning has been an purple and we have been particularly hearing about a family. a couple and their children were all killed in the grenfell tower fire. we have heard very moving tributes from a brother and sister of the victim. they were described as they had a twinkle in their eye, had ba nter had a twinkle in their eye, had banter and could break the ice with someone with everyone they met. another victim did a lot of charity
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work, she was always laughing and famous for entertaining her guests. we can hear part of the tribute read by the sister—in—law. 0ur sister—in—law was the anchor of herfamily 0ur sister—in—law was the anchor of her family she had a real presence in the community and she was loved by many. she was our family, she was our sister and she will always be remembered for her strength her kindness and her love for others. we miss her dearly. speaking about her sister—in—law there who was killed in the fire. we also heard about her three children. three of their cousins read a very moving tribute to them. they spoke of one of the children being full of life and well liked in the community. talking of them being
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beautiful and empathy beyond her yea rs beautiful and empathy beyond her years full beautiful and empathy beyond her yea rs full stop beautiful and empathy beyond her years full stop and we heard from nine—year—old sarah who talked about her cousin. she said he was someone who wanted to be a vet fire man according to one of his teacher and there is a plaque at his primary school that the children go to whenever they feel sad to remember his smile and his kindness. here are the words of young nine—year old sara. iam the words of young nine—year old sara. i am looking forward to continuing playing with baby logan's sisters again, but it is difficult that he will not be there. and we apologise for pulling away from that report but we are bringing you the images that the world's media have been waiting on in new york to see harvey weinstein the film producer. and handing himself into police. 0ne
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reporter shouting, how come it took you so long to surrender, harvey? harvey weinstein saying nothing as he entered the police department in manhattan. just showing you these images of his arrival again. that question from the reporter refers to the fact that it is summer seven and a half, eight months since these allegations from what turned out to be dozens of women began to emerge accusing him of rape and other sexual assaults. 0ur correspondence is still there on the scene for us and has been watching this. so straight into the door, saying nothing, tell us what is going to be happening to harvey weinstein now. right before, it was very clear he
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was approaching in his black suv. the nypd closed down the street allowing the cameras of the world to have a front row unobstructed view to harvey weinstein walking with a bit of a limp, saying nothing into the nypd's bit of a limp, saying nothing into the nypd‘s first precinct. according to the new york times, inside he is expected to pay $1 million bail. he will receive an ankle bracelet and surrender his passport so he is unable to leave the country and then he will appear in a criminal court here in new york. this is the first criminal case against harvey weinstein since those allegations that he sexually abused even raped allegedly dozens of women in october and authorities here were under intense pressure during this lengthy investigation and certainly now, the
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district attorney's office feel they have enough evidence to charge him with sexual misconduct. but we understand that according to some reports that when he does appear in the court he will be granted bail. that is our understanding, that he will have to stay and will not be allowed to leave the country, of course he is such a high—profile figure this is a very high profile case that needs to be handed with the utmost sensitivity. to give you a sense of the charges, we believe the charges are in connection to at least one accuser, lucia evans says here in new york at his tribeca office in 2004, key forced her to perform sexual acts and she says she told him to stop, she tried to get away but he overpowered her. they believe investigators may have other
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allegations in these charges as well because there have been speaking to dozens because there have been speaking to d oze ns of because there have been speaking to dozens of people in relation to this investigation stop we know other women who have come forward to the nypd, including an actress who accused him of rape. 0ur accused him of rape. our weekly on exactly how many charges are how many charges he will be facing today, will it be charges on the allegations made by one actress or more? us media are reporting that he will face rape charges in the first and third degree but it is unclear which person but relates to a. and he will also face charges for criminal misconduct in relation to the aspiring actress lucia evans. it is important to say that investigators are still working on this case as
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well so until we are able to see the criminal complaint in fall from the district attorney's office it is impossible to say out the full extent of what charges harvey weinstein will face. he is being investigated here in new york and also in london, federal prosecutors have had a grand jury looking at possible federal fraud charges against harvey weinstein as well so he is feeling the full weight. for the moment, thank you very much. 0ur north america correspondent there. you have the time is 12:30pm exactly. we are going to stay with this story and talk to a film critic whojoins us via this story and talk to a film critic who joins us via webcam. 0bviously this is a huge moment for everyone
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who follows this story and not least the dozens of women who in the last 7.5 or eight months have been coming forward to say they have been abused by him. absolutely, this is the moment everyone has been waiting for since the news broke and it is the biggest thing to happen in the film industry for a long time and it has kick—started a new wave of the feminist movement so all eyes will be on this and it will be fascinating to see how it plays out. i fascinating to see how it plays out. ,0f fascinating to see how it plays out. , of course, although many campaigns emerged out of all of this, many campaigners will say it is certainly a the moment but not a time to necessarily say that they have done theirjob and the campaigns are finished. absolutely, we need to keep banging the drum and keep the lame alive and the campaign is very important with many ramifications across all industries, notjust the film industry, and many other
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ongoing cases. it has brought attention to that but i hope the interest will be sustained because it is such a huge issue that has affected so many women's. is it making a big industry —— impact in the way the film industry operates? i was at the way the film industry operates? iwas ata the way the film industry operates? i was at a film festival recently and there was a different flavour to it this year when there was a wonderful protest of many women in the industry and there was a lot more talk about representation and people of colour on film and on the sidelines there was less of the feeling that men were on the yachts trying to seduce women. it still goes on but most people were a bit more careful about how they behave in the film industry and beyond and i think it is a hugely important thing. the ramifications continue in the film industry and the types of films being made and people are aware that female directors need more opportunities so the influences very large. thank you for talking to
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us about that. we are reflecting upon the arrival of harvey weinstein at the police in new york to hand himself in to the new york police department. it is time for a look at the weather forecast. hello. the bank holiday weekend is fast approaching and it is still looking warm for all of us but there will be subtle differences. today the best of the sunshine is in scotla nd the best of the sunshine is in scotland and northern ireland with a risk of thundery showers in the south and not as much widespread rain as there has been. it will ease away and there is developing sunshine further south which triggered sharp showers which can linger. they will either way through the night. it is quite muddy and close and mist and fog as well after the showers and rain that we have seen but it will be cooler further north. a few showers around tomorrow but it should be on the whole the driest of the two days this weekend
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if you live in england and wales and in scotland and northern ireland you have the east coast chilly breeze and low cloud at times and it is essentially sunny and a cold start. there is a greater risk of storms being triggered later in the day on saturday and particular sunday and there are warnings on the website but we will keep you posted and see you later. good afternoon. this is bbc newsroom live. our latest headlines: in the last few minutes harvey weinstein has handed himself into police in new york to face criminal charges for the first time after numerous accusations of rape sexual assault. a man who attacked a 96—year—old world war ii veteran with a claw hammer has been found guilty of attempted murder. joseph isaacs struckjim booth on the head six times and left him for dead during a burglary last year. a report making the case for independence by the scottish national party says the country should do its best to attract more immigrants should scotland leave the uk.
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the document was produced to make an economic case for secession. the prime minister's europe adviser 0liver robbins has defended the work of britain's brexit team after reports that the eu accused the government of having a fantasy approach to withdrawal negotiations. north korea has said it's still willing to talk at any time in any form after us president donald trump abruptly cancelled his meeting with kim jong—un. the leaders had been due to meet in singapore to discuss denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. scotland's first minister and snp leader nicola sturgeon says a new report out today will restart the debate about scottish independence. the sustainable growth commission, which was established by the snp to look at future economic prospects, will set out proposals
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for a so—called come to scotland package as part of efforts to boost the country's population. but 0pposition parties say the snp's pursuit of independence is doing nothing for scotland's economy. the report says scotland should keep sterling for the first few years after independence in order to set interest rates and other monetary policies. the report also contains detailed plans to help fund continuing uk debt to promote respect and good order towards the rest of the united kingdom. and in a bid to drive immigration and population growth, the report recommends that highly skilled migrant workers should receive a tax relief. let's talk to sirjohn curtice now, professor of politics at strathclyde university. good to have you with us, as ever. does this kick—start or restart the discussion around independence square was magellan macro there
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certainly are some marked differences between the case made in this document and the case made in the independence referendum in 2014. you have already highlighted one of them which is the focus on immigration as one of the ways it is argued that the scottish economy could be made to grow more quickly and emulate what the report argues is the exemplar ours of smaller countries elsewhere and their immigration was not a subject that was much discussed back in 2014 and equally you have not mentioned the document laying out a relatively conservative fiscal strategy which was basically saying that in the early years an independent scotland should not borrow too much and therefore try and ensure that it becomes fiscally credible and it is able to borrow on the markets. it is able to borrow on the markets. it is a different tone from the tone of 2014. somethings have also dropped and be moved from 2014. you are right to say that an independent
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scotla nd right to say that an independent scotland in the first ten years would continue to use the pound but crucially it would no longer be using the pound as part of a monetary union, part of an agreement with the rest of the uk. this would just simply be scotland using the pound without any particular authority from the rest of the uk. ifi authority from the rest of the uk. if i can interrupt you, we might remind our view is that during the independence referendum campaign george osborne, then chancellor, is ruled out the idea of a monetary union where scotland could continue to use sterling. yes, that is one of the key reasons why the document now moves to what is just using the pound anyway because it means no longer in a future independence referendum could the uk government use that particular argument because they say they are going to use it anyway. 0ne they say they are going to use it anyway. one of the other arguments in the 2014 referendum was about whether or not an independent scotla nd whether or not an independent scotland would ever have been able
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to bail out the royal bank of scotla nd to bail out the royal bank of scotland and the bank of scotland. this document effectively acknowledges that scotland no longer has its own banking sector and an independent scotland would not be expecting to bail out a major international bank. the other thing it does is it says the way to achieve economic growth is not through lowering business taxes, that was an idea raised in 2014, it is basically saying that they try to do it through immigration and through productivity, our long—standing difficulty. through productivity, our long-standing difficulty. in your opinion is that a difficulty with this report, that it is looking at immigration growth to drive population growth, which is a bit of a difference from the independence referendum campaign when there was a lot of focus on oil revenue. yes, oil is now taking out of the equation. basically the document now says any more money out of oil should be saved rather than used to fund current expenditure. the big
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idea is whether or not there is enoughin idea is whether or not there is enough in this document to persuade people of what the snp would argue isa people of what the snp would argue is a positive case for independence. there are a lot of worthy words in there about a national economic strategy and cross—party co—operation in the productivity commission but none of these things are immediately arresting ideas apart from the idea of immigration which could potentially prove rather controversial. it is the task of the document that it is not yet clear whether it has achieved what i think it has achieved. what it has achieved as it has made some of the areas where the case in 2014 was attacked, on currency and the scottish fiscal position and the banking sector, it has probably made ita banking sector, it has probably made it a slightly more bombproof argument and it was in 2014 but at the end of the day it will be the strength of the positive argument in the eyes of voters that will be crucial. thank you. good to have your thoughts. thank you very much. north korea says it is willing to continue dialogue with the united states at any time and any place. it comes after president trump announced he's cancelling a planned
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summit with kimjong un in singapore next month. 0ur asia correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes reports. if pyongyang suspected its longed—for summit with the us president was about to be cancelled, there was no sign of it here. at a top—secret site, deep in the mountains, a group of foreign journalists were shown the tunnels where north korea tested its nuclear weapons. and then the show began. in a series of dramatic explosions, like something out of a hollywood movie, north korea's nuclear test site was blown to smithereens. one of the foreign reporters described what they saw. it was pretty surreal, north korea invited in a small group of journalists, they took us on a train about 12 hours up to their nuclear test site which is in a remote mountainous region of north korea.
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and then they blew the thing up, they blew up three remaining tests tunnels at the site. they were laced with explosives, they walked us right up to the doors of these tunnels to show us. then they blew it up and then brought us back and said, double check, see we have done this, we want to be transparent. the only problem is, the only people there were journalists, not experts on what it takes to shut down a nuclear test site. what we saw with our eyes is that they did blow up the entrances to the tunnels, we do not know what else occurred or if that site is unusable. this was supposed to be pyongyang's big gesture ahead of the kim—trump summit. but thousands of miles away in washington, president trump had suddenly changed his mind. based on the recent statement of north korea, i have decided to terminate the planned summit in singapore onjune12. i believe that this is a tremendous setback for north korea and indeed a setback for the world. when it came, north korea's response
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was surprisingly soft. the unilateral announcement to cancel the summit is unexpected and we cannot but feel great regret from it, the vice foreign minister said. we have the intent to sit with the us side to solve problems regardless, at any time. here in seoul, there has also been shock and consternation. this photo shows a grim faced president moonjae—in holding an emergency cabinet meeting in the middle of the night. he said he was perplexed and regretful. apparently no—one from washington had bothered to call him before his close ally president trump made his dramatic announcement. this morning, china has said it's still worth hoping that a summit could go ahead. a foreign ministry spokesman urged the united states and north korea to try to meet each other halfway. the setbacks in preparing for the
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summit. we have noted that president trump said he is still willing to meet with the chairman kim jong—un ata meet with the chairman kim jong—un at a particular time. they are willing to sit down with the us and decide to resolve the issue. the recent situation on the peninsula and the political process are faced with a rare opportunity. 0ther parties have all demonstrated our willingness and made efforts to this
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end. the position on this issue is clear—cut and we believe as the parties are concerned to the issue the summit can pay a tv role in the denuclearisation of the peninsular. we think both parties can cherish the recent positive progress and stay patient and demonstrate goodwill and moving the same direction and continue to stay committed to promoting resolving each other‘s concerns in a dialogue and a conversation. further reaction from china to that cancelled summit. a leading cancer scientist says the serious failures in england's breast cancer screening programme go back further, and affected more women than previously thought. hundreds of thousands of women were not invited for a scan when they were aged between 68 and 71. here's our health and science correspondent james gallagher.
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screening helps spot breast cancer early. women aged 50—70 should be offered a mammogram every three years but it was revealed computer problems meant some invites were never sent and the failure may have shortened to lives. have shortened 270 lives. tragically there are likely to be some people in this group who would have been alive today if the failure had not happened. officials said the problem started in 2009 but new research shows it goes back to 2005, some four years earlier. the government had estimated 450,000 women were not invited for their final scan but now scientists say tens of thousands more women may have been affected. it's taken 13 years to spot that we did not implement the policy the way we said we were going to do it. things need to change to make sure that we work out what we are doing and it is somebody‘s job to actually inspect, to collect the data, inspect the data and make sure we are doing things right.
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public health england rejected the findings seeing the analysis was flawed and that an independent review will look at all aspects of the breast screening service. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: harvey weinstein has handed himself in to police in new york to face criminal charges for the first time after numerous accusations of rape and sexual assault. joseph isaacs is found guilty of the attempted murder of 96—year—old d—day veteranjim booth after repeatedly hitting him on the head with a hammer. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon says a new report out today will restart the debate about scottish independence an update on the market numbers for you. here's how london's ftse 100 is trading, and germany's dax. trade now underway in the united states with the dow and the nasdaq numbers on the board. a new law designed to give
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people more control over their data has taken effect. the general data protection regulation or gdpr affects how companies and organisations collect, store and share information, but what does it mean for you, how you run your business, how companies can use your personal data. a little earlier, for bbc ask this, i was joined by chris foxx, bbc‘s technology correspondent, and annabel kaye, an employment law and hr specialist and co—founder of koffeeklatch, a firm that consults on gdpr, and started by asking chris, what is gdpr? it is designed to standardise all the different countries local data protection laws, so everyone is on the same page. it has a further scope than that because even companies outside the eu, in china or the us, will have to follow the
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new rules if they are offering services within the eu and it gives us new rights at such as access and erasure such as if you can go to a big company you can ask for a copy of all your information and if you are not happy for them to have it you can ask them to do delete it so for us as consumers it is good news. why are we getting all these e—mails? 0bviously these companies wa nt to e—mails? 0bviously these companies want to maintain a relationship with us even if we ordered something from them ten years ago. even if we never did!| them ten years ago. even if we never did! i have e—mails from people i have never done business with. this is for two reasons. one is the rules on consent are changing and people used to steal information from online sites and put you on their mailing list and e—mail your stuff and if they e—mail you after today they need a positive consent from you to do that. the other one is a big misunderstanding that the idea has been extended to everyone who contact has been extended to everyone who co nta ct you has been extended to everyone who contact you about anything so if you are an existing customer you already
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can be e—mailed. people have got in a muddle and the whole world has decided to spam my inbox this morning with e—mails. decided to spam my inbox this morning with e-mails. we have a question here from twitter asking, why haven't the gdpr e—mails stopped. he is still getting them today. companies are exercising an abundance of caution. if they have not previously sought consent you on mailing list it kind of makes sense and it is good manners to ask if they are above the law. there are other reasons why companies can contact other reasons why companies can co nta ct you other reasons why companies can contact you and it would not be unreasonable if you are part of a swimming clubfor unreasonable if you are part of a swimming club for them to send you e—mails without you specifically consenting because you would expect to get e—mails from them. consenting because you would expect to get e-mails from them. this links to get e-mails from them. this links to this question that asks, how come some companies are still sending an t some companies are still sending an opt in e—mail after —— and others are saying i do not need to respond. it might be that you have different relationships with them. your
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relationships with them. your relationship as a customer or member does not necessarily need concerned. your relationship someone they might sell some into day does. there is all sorts of different relationships going on and that is why you are getting different e—mails. going on and that is why you are getting different e-mails. this is quite a specific one that asks of the charity outsources it services is the it company a third—party processor of all the data? could you explain for our viewers what the implications of the context is. gdpr is full ofjargon and one of the ideasis is full ofjargon and one of the ideas is first and second and third parties so the first party would be the data subject, so if you are collecting information about me it is me. the second party is the organisation and in this case it is a charity and if the charities using software of virtual assistants or a
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data processor. it is perfectly safe to ignore these e—mails, isn't it? no if you ignore them in theory they will take you off the mailing list and you will not get any more e—mails from them. and you will not get any more e-mails from them. it is not all about consent, there are other reasons why companies may keep you on their mailing list so you might still get marketing messages and do not be surprised if you do. we are looking at these e—mails coming in and we are paying attention to the ones where we might do business with the company again and order something from them or they like the company and the ones we haven't had much to do with over the years we arejust much to do with over the years we are just deleting, much to do with over the years we arejust deleting, i guess much to do with over the years we are just deleting, i guess everyone is in the same boat. should those company really have you on record after yea rs
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should those company really have you on record after years of not doing business with them? i don't think that part of the law has really changed. there were data protection laws beforehand that said you should remove data that was not relevant and you were not using it. this is important for making the companies look at who is on their books. important for making the companies look at who is on their booksm makes us all think about our data and where it is and who has got it and where it is and who has got it and who is using it. and who we are sharing it with. i logged into a coffee bar near her and i use the free wi—fi in the first thing asked before was my date of birth and my genderand! before was my date of birth and my genderand i failto before was my date of birth and my gender and i fail to see how you need either in order to give me access to wi—fi. we are very greedy about data as businesses.“ access to wi—fi. we are very greedy about data as businesses. if we look at this from a business and employers perspective, i would get both of you to answer this, how does it affect them? has been hugely unwieldy for some businesses, particularly smaller ones? it depends where they were in the first place. if they were already compliant with the data protection laws we had yesterday it is a 10% or 20% shift. the problem is there are literally hundreds of thousands of small businesses who have not heard
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of the laws that we already had until yesterday and then they woke up until yesterday and then they woke up that they had to comply with the new ones. that is tricky if you do not think that way and you have never heard of it and all of a sudden you do not know you are doing. for small businesses it is perhaps a bit harder to comply but they are common—sense things. if you area they are common—sense things. if you are a salon and you have customer records, even if you keep them on paper on a file, you should lock them away and stop people getting access to them who should not have access to them who should not have a ccess so access to them who should not have access so it is common sense and keeping people's data is secure and not collecting more data than you need. do you think there will be a grace period? we have heard companies could potentially be given large fines if they fail to comply. could there be a grace period? some companies have already sought for an extension to the deadline. a web domain registry, you can look online and see who owns web domains which isa and see who owns web domains which is a register of contact details and
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they saw for a register because they would not be compliant on time but the eu said no. they had already had two years and in the last few minutes we have heard of four complaints being made against google, what's up, facebook and instagram already from privacy advocates because they are in breach of the law because they are bundling consent and saying either you sign up consent and saying either you sign up and agree to have targeted advertising and hand over all of your data or you do not use the service. it is bundling consent and it is not allowed, they argue, and gdp are because you have to separate the consent for the service and for the consent for the service and for the advertising. that is very interesting. for all of us on the receiving end of these e—mails, if we are receiving end of these e—mails, if we a re really receiving end of these e—mails, if we are really missing that e—mailfrom a e—mail from a particular company bowing up e—mail from a particular company popping up in our inbox all we have to do is opt in again. absolutely. but watch out there are other e—mails being sent now from scammers
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and hoping you might click another button. there is another opportunity to get your questions answered later today at 2:30pm. chris and annabel will be back to answer your questions and you can send them to us. in a moment the news at one with jane hill. first the weather. the bank holiday weekend is almost upon us but there is some uncertainty because for many it will be warm but not necessarily drive. a lot of dry weather across the north of the country but further south closer to low pressure and the heat we will be at risk of thundery downpours and there are already warnings out and they are on the website. through the day we have had rain and some of it will be thundery and there could be thunderstorms moving southern and eastern but further north if you are heading off to the biggest weekend in belfast it is fine and warm and temperatures will tail off. there is an outside
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chance of some showers creeping into the borders of scotland and they could creep further north. it is dry and fine. the storms will tend to ease through the night but they have left the moisture so it will turn misty and murky especially crossing to down weighing and in the east coast once again we will have misty low cloud and quite keen east breeze keeping it cool. inland temperatures pick up this weekend and they may approach record—breaking for the second time in a row. it will be warm. there will be showers around potentially in england and where is and there is a keen breeze on the coach —— coast limiting the temperature somewhat but it looks as though it should be drierfor temperature somewhat but it looks as though it should be drier for parts of wales and the midlands and northern england where we have had rain today. we cannot rule out thundery showers, particularly late in the day. it is looking fine and dry in scotland and northern ireland and noticed the low cloud at times. it is brought onshore by the easterly breeze. if you are heading off to swansea the biggest weekend sta rts off to swansea the biggest weekend starts here on saturday and it looks
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fine and dry for the start but there are showers across the channel and they are likely to spread north on saturday and sunday. it is a greater risk of really torrential downpours. the lion's share of the dry and sunny weather is further north across scotland and northern ireland. we are closer to the low pressure a cross ireland. we are closer to the low pressure across the southern part of the uk and in france there will be big storms around in the weekend and they continue into the bank holiday as well. not so much across the northern part of the country, although you can see some in belfast and manchester. potentially it is further south and west where there could be lengthier downpours with hail thunder and gusty winds. goodbye for now. the disgraced us film producer harvey weinstein hands himself in to police in new york. eight months after women
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started speaking out, he's expected to face charges relating to sexual misconduct. we'll have the latest from the police station in new york. also this lunchtime: north korea says it's willing to speak to donald trump at any time in any form, after the us president called off a planned summit. a burglar is found guilty of attempted murder, after attacking a 96—year—old d—day veteran with a claw hammer in his home. today's the day for big changes to data laws — designed to increase protection for people online. the stage is set for the bbc‘s biggest weekend — four days of live music is about to begin across all four nations.
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